Milwaukee road 261

03.01.2021

The Steam Locomotive and heritage Milwaukee Road passenger cars traveling from Minneapolis on the Burlington Northern rail tracks arrives in Duluth for the weekend. See photos and a video in the article below. Lake Superior Railway Museum. The last time we saw the amazing Steam Locomotive in action was in the fall of when it ran a fall color rail excursion along the Mississippi River. We didn't get tot ride the train on that occasion but followed it from Winona, Minnesota to LaCrosse, Wisconsin getting several photos of the train and its classic railroading cars.

A year after that trip the took a "leave of absence" from rail trips to undergo some major maintenance to its boiler and running gear. During this interim til the returned to service, we did get to ride on the same vintage rail train on a fall excursion to Superior, Wisconsin. It was truly a blast from the past riding the train and being waited on and entertained by a staff of railroading afficinados playing the roles of s era conductors, porters, etc. The returned to service in but other travel plans prevented us from riding or seeing her back in action.

Below are some pictures of the locomotive with descriptions and a video I made of the train as it came into town. It will arrive at the Lake Superior Railroad Museum on Saturday afternoon and overnight there until departing on Sunday for the return trip.

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You can see the train at the station Saturday afternoon or Sunday morning. These two photos give you an idea of the size of this beauty. Standing 15 feet 6 inches high and weighing in atpounds; a ultra heavy weight fighter indeed. In the one photo you can see the fire burning in the boiler through the headlight.

The Engine and Tender is feet 7 inches long and can carry up to 25 tons of coal. It's water capacity is 20, gallons.

milwaukee road 261

She is an S3 style locomotive with a wheel arrangement. The S3 was the zenith in steam engine technology. Paul, and Pacific Railroad Trustand was completed in July of serial These and other classic heritage railroading cars are shown in the following video. Croix Valley 1st Class Passenger Coach. On our ScenicPathways website you can see some pictures of the interior of some of the vintage rail cars and our article on our Milwaukee Road rail trip.

This trip had essentially the same set of classic cars as the one shown above - with the exception of being pulled by an Amtrak Diesel instead of the Steam Locomotive. But I've been told by a North Shore volunteer train fireman that by the spring of another steam locomotive will be ready for service: the Duluth and Northeastern Locomotive Milwaukee Road Locomotive Website - including tickets for rides.

North Shore Scenic Railway. Things to Do and See in Duluth, Minnesota. Duluth Tall Ships Festival. Gooseberry Falls State Park. Grand Marais Minnesota and its beautiful harbor voted as the favorite village around Lake Superior by circle tour travelers. Scenic Fall Color Train Ride. Skyline Drive offers best views of Fall Color in Duluth. Weather Reports. Photos of the Milwaukee Road Steam Locomotive These two photos give you an idea of the size of this beauty.

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milwaukee road 261

Locomotive By Steve Glischinski January 11, Sign up. By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Trains magazine. View our privacy policy. Thank you! Your email address has been successfully added to the Trains Industry Newsletter. Paul, Minn. It is one of four surviving Milwaukee Road E9s.

The acquisition is a natural for the Friends, which also owns Milwaukee Road No. All were delivered in UP yellow colors. The numbering sequence for the third set was A, B, and C. In the unit began service for Amtrak, officially leaving the Milwaukee Road roster in June Amtrak had the unit rebuilt at the Milwaukee Shops where it lost its side porthole windows and was renumbered It was then sold to the Alaska Railroad where it was renumbered The 10C was retained but saw minimal use.This classic locomotive, with its iconic streamline design will make a great addition to the Friends fleet.

While the engine is close to perfection, it still needs some minor mechanical work and most of all a paint job to match the fleet. Donations will go toward repainting the locomotive and to and mechanical work to make it ready for the excursion season. The numbering sequence for the third set was A, B and C. Later the set would become 32A, 32B and 32C. Records indicate the unit was retired by the Milwaukee Road in the early s when it was conveyed to Amtrakwhich had it rebuilt at the Milwaukee Shops and renumbered it Amtrak About this time the Alaska Railroad was looking for passenger cars and locomotives to upgrade their passenger service.

The locomotive is in full operating condition and will be a welcome addition to our historic fleet of equipment. It was the desire of the railroad to see the locomotive go to a good home that would continue to use it and keep it in good working order, not rusting away in a museum back lot or going to scrap. Printable Donation Form. Toggle navigation. Donation Form. First Name Last Name.How to find your Trainz build number: Open the Trainz App on your computer Before launching the game, locate the 5 digit build number on the bottom right corner of the launch window.

Numberedthey were designated the S-3 class, and were used for heavy mainline freights and occasionally subbing on crack passenger trains. Weighing in atlbs, they produced hp and had a maximum speed of mph. They sported a few unusual features as well. An all weather enclosed cab due to the sub-zero winter temperatures, a combination sand and steam dome, an red oscillating Mars Light, a massive cast steal pilot with folding coupler, and probably the most unusual, an air horn.

She was fired up in and has been running ever since. Modifications are permitted for personal use only! All sales are final! No refunds will be issued for any product purchased once a download is initiated. Search for: Search. Add to cart. Download the file included in your order confirmation email or from your account downloads.

Launch your Trainz Content Manager. Drag the downloaded cdp file into the content manager window. OR While in content manager, go to FILE on the top left and select "import cdp" or "import content", find your downloaded cdp and select.The Milwaukee Road is a "Northern" type steam locomotive in which the railroad once owned nearly fifty such designs. Like most late model steam locomotives, the Chicago, Milwaukee, St.

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Today, two of the Milwaukee Road's s remain preserved; on static display at the Illinois Railway Museum and the most famous, Inreturned to excursion service.

Since that time the big has once again been awing the public as it hosts excursions across the Midwest. While several railroads had different names for their designs the Milwaukee Road stuck with the traditional "Northern" designation.

Purely on looks the Northern Type, in general, was one of the most beautiful steam locomotive designs ever developed. This steam locomotive gained its name from the Northern Pacific Railway due to the fact that to burn the low-grade coal found along the railroad the steamer needed a larger firebox.

Chicago, Milwaukee, St. A History Of Northerns For the Milwaukee Road its use of s began in when the railroad's motive power department, well-known for developing or enhancing steam locomotive designs, worked in conjunction with the Baldwin Locomotive Works to construct a Northern, which originally received the road number but was later changed to upon the railroad receiving more such designs.

The Milwaukee Road was the railroad's most advanced design, and one of the most advanced steam locomotives in general having been built in Following the railroad's originaldesignated as Class S-1, it placed either no interest or no need for any future s until the late s when Baldwin completed an order of thirty for the railroad in This group of s, with road numberswas designated as Class S-2 and was the most powerful and heaviest Northerns the Milwaukee would ever own exerting 70, pounds of tractive effort with a boiler pressure of pounds-per-square-inch in comparison the railroad's two other Northern classes could produce tractive efforts of only between 60, and 62, pounds.

In the Milwaukee Road return to Baldwin for more s, which also were Class S-2s and road numbers The railroad's final order of Northerns came in and were needed for the wartime traffic boom.

This time the Milwaukee contracted with the American Locomotive Company Alco for ten more s classed as S-3s with road numbers They were less powerful than the S-2s but were more efficient as the S-3s featured the latest in steam locomotive technology such as roller bearings.

It should be noted that the Milwaukee Road's own shop forces constructed a in It was listed as Class S-1 with the road number and had a similar rating to its earlier sister, ex- built in In general the railroad used all of its Northerns in freight service, particularly its powerful S-2s. During this time the Milwaukee Road was an innovative and forward thinking railroad.

As such, it wasted little time embracing the diesel locomotive and purchased many before wartime restrictions forbid construction of diesels. After the war the railroad picked up its pace of replacing its steam fleet and for the s, their time was short. In the case of Milwaukee Road and its sister Class S-3s, they saw barely a decade of service before retirement inaround the time virtually all of the Northerns were retired. For Milwaukee Road it was one of the survivors as the railroad donated the locomotive to the National Railroad Museum in Green Bay, Wisconsin inthe first piece of equipment the museum ever owned.

In just two years Milwaukee Road 's restoration was complete and it immediately began to see use in excursion service. Since its restoration has become a celebrity across the country operating both east and west, in conjunction with Class Is and Amtrak, and for numerous promotional events.

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The RHMA is headed by Steve Sandberg and it is operated as a quasi-business although it is technically a non-profit organization. This philosophy has allowed the Milwaukee Road to prosper, enabling it to be properly maintained year-after-year and even feature an entire consist of restored passenger cars virtually all of which are of Milwaukee Road lineagewhich are maintained to Amtrak standards.

Of course, the operation also would not be successful without the large group of volunteers who take pride in maintaining the In late the locomotive was in danger of never running again. When the went down in the fall of for its normal FRA boiler inspection a renewed lease, which expired at year's end, remained unresolved.Paul and Pacific Railroadoften referred to as the " Milwaukee Road ".

It was used for heavy mainline freight work until being retired by the railroad in Instead of being cut up for scrapwas preserved and donated to the National Railroad Museum in Green Bay, Wisconsin in Today, the locomotive is owned, operated, and maintained by Minneapolis -based nonprofit organization Friends of thewhich runs occasional and seasonal excursion trains using the locomotive. Paul and Pacific Railroad, which was also known as the Milwaukee Road.

It operated with the railroad pulling mostly freight trains on the eastern portions of the route and was assigned to the Milwaukee Division by March As the new museum's first acquisition, was moved to the museum site in Inthe newly formed "North Star Rail" selected for restoration for mainline excursions.

It was selected for a variety of reasons. The engine was large enough to handle the expected trains at track speed. It featured several modern features for a steam locomotive, including easier to maintain roller bearings.

It also already had its asbestos lagging removed, which is very expensive to remove for environmental and safety reasons. Finally, 's relatively short 10 year service life meant that the engine's boiler is more pristine, meaning it would take less work to rebuild the engine. North Star Rail and the National Railroad Museum came to an agreement in November for a ten-year lease, which was later renewed ten years later.

There, a full-time staff rebuilt the engine. Work progressed quickly, allowing for a hydrostatic test in Junea test fireup in July, and the eventual restoration completion in September. The engine later returned to its new home at the leased Burlington Northern Minneapolis Junction. The following year, had an extensive season, including excursions on Wisconsin Central and the Twin Cities and Western Railroad.

Notable events included "Chocolate City Days" excursions, campaign trains, a movie shoot painted as " Lackawanna ", running over CSX tracks for the famed "New River Train", and a wrap up celebrating the engine's 50th birthday in Over five days, deadheaded from Minneapolis to Scranton, Pennsylvania. The locomotive stayed in Scranton for the next year pulling numerous excursions, including rare mileage trips, a rare snow plow run, and the engine's first steam doubleheader with Susquehanna The year of presented on its biggest assignment yet as it was the first steam engine to pull BNSF's Employee Appreciation Special.

The season was short with a weekend excursion in May from Minneapolis to Duluth along with runs on the Lake Superior Railroad Museum 's tracks, along with another excursion in September. The year saw leading excursions out of places such as Chicago, Omahaand Kansas City.

The next year, pulled an almost matching consist between Minneapolis and Chicago. At this point, insurance rates were skyrocketing due to outside events as well as new FRA guidelines. The Friends of the had an insurance policy to run throughmaking these trips among the last time that the group could afford to have run solo. In the following months, some major changes were made to the Friends of the 's operations.

With insurance being too high to charge reasonable ticket prices, the group decided to team up with Amtrak. Amtrak is self insured, so the added cost of excursion insurance was much less. However, Amtrak requires that all equipment meet Amtrak certification. The engine became the second steam engine to become Amtrak certified, and the Friends of the began to buy or rebuild coaches that would meet Amtrak specifications.

The first team up with Amtrak occurred in October with the engine's return to old Milwaukee Road tracks between Minneapolis to Winona, Minnesota. These trips have been repeated each year until Paul and Pacific Railroadoften referred to as the " Milwaukee Road ".

It was used for heavy mainline freight work until being retired by the railroad in Instead of being cut up for scrapwas preserved and donated to the National Railroad Museum in Green Bay, Wisconsin in Today, the locomotive is owned, operated, and maintained by Minneapolis -based nonprofit organization Friends of thewhich runs occasional and seasonal excursion trains using the locomotive.

Paul and Pacific Railroad, which was also known as the Milwaukee Road. It operated with the railroad pulling mostly freight trains on the eastern portions of the route and was assigned to the Milwaukee Division by March As the new museum's first acquisition, was moved to the museum site in Inthe newly formed "North Star Rail" selected for restoration for mainline excursions.

It was selected for a variety of reasons. The engine was large enough to handle the expected trains at track speed. It featured several modern features for a steam locomotive, including easier to maintain roller bearings. It also already had its asbestos lagging removed, which is very expensive to remove for environmental and safety reasons.

Finally, 's relatively short 10 year service life meant that the engine's boiler is more pristine, meaning it would take less work to rebuild the engine.

North Star Rail and the National Railroad Museum came to an agreement in November for a ten-year lease, which was later renewed ten years later. There, a full-time staff rebuilt the engine. Work progressed quickly, allowing for a hydrostatic test in Junea test fireup in July, and the eventual restoration completion in September.

Milwaukee Road 261

The engine later returned to its new home at the leased Burlington Northern Minneapolis Junction. The following year, had an extensive season, including excursions on Wisconsin Central and the Twin Cities and Western Railroad. Notable events included "Chocolate City Days" excursions, campaign trains, a movie shoot painted as " Lackawanna ", running over CSX tracks for the famed "New River Train", and a wrap up celebrating the engine's 50th birthday in Over five days, deadheaded from Minneapolis to Scranton, Pennsylvania.

The locomotive stayed in Scranton for the next year pulling numerous excursions, including rare mileage trips, a rare snow plow run, and the engine's first steam doubleheader with Susquehanna The year of presented on its biggest assignment yet as it was the first steam engine to pull BNSF's Employee Appreciation Special. The season was short with a weekend excursion in May from Minneapolis to Duluth along with runs on the Lake Superior Railroad Museum 's tracks, along with another excursion in September.

The year saw leading excursions out of places such as Chicago, Omahaand Kansas City. The next year, pulled an almost matching consist between Minneapolis and Chicago.

At this point, insurance rates were skyrocketing due to outside events as well as new FRA guidelines.

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The Friends of the had an insurance policy to run throughmaking these trips among the last time that the group could afford to have run solo. In the following months, some major changes were made to the Friends of the 's operations. With insurance being too high to charge reasonable ticket prices, the group decided to team up with Amtrak.

Amtrak is self insured, so the added cost of excursion insurance was much less. However, Amtrak requires that all equipment meet Amtrak certification. The engine became the second steam engine to become Amtrak certified, and the Friends of the began to buy or rebuild coaches that would meet Amtrak specifications.

The first team up with Amtrak occurred in October with the engine's return to old Milwaukee Road tracks between Minneapolis to Winona, Minnesota. These trips have been repeated each year until In Junethe engine made its first return visit to Milwaukee since being restored, overnighting on its way to Chicago to participate in the Grand Excursionan approximate reenactment of the original Grand Excursion of It departed from Chicago, arriving in Rock Island, Illinois to celebrate the th anniversary of the first railroad to reach the Mississippi River.

For these runs, the train was turned at New Lisbon. These excursions would be repeated in August

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